Chris Uggen's Blog: u.s. supreme court refuses to hear johnson v. bush

Monday, November 14, 2005

u.s. supreme court refuses to hear johnson v. bush

from yahoo news:

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court refused Monday to review Florida's lifetime ban on voting rights for convicted felons, a case that would have had national implications for millions of would-be voters.


i worked for several years, took a lengthy deposition, and wrote an expert report on this case (johnson v. bush), so the news is disappointing.

7 Comments:

At 2:33 PM, Anonymous sarah said...

Ouch. That would be/is disappointing. Sounds like states' rights (versus individual, civil, human, etc. rights) won the day. I guess that's not surprising given a conservative-leaning court...

 
At 3:55 PM, Anonymous Ochen K. said...

Very disappointing. I guess we just keep working.

 
At 10:06 PM, Blogger Tom Volscho said...

Where can we read the report? if possible

 
At 9:29 AM, Blogger jeremy said...

I was sorry to hear about this. You might not be able to change this court decision, but your larger work on the topic has changed how at least some people think about the surrounding issues.

 
At 11:09 AM, Blogger christopher uggen said...

thanks, sarah, ochen, tom, and jeremy. i'd by lying if i didn't say i'm disappointed by the outcome. what's more frustrating in such cases, however, is that no judge ever even looked at the piles and piles of social science evidence. so it goes...

tom, my use of data for some parts of the case was under a federal protective order. i think i can now release the report without risking a stint in federal prison, but i'll have to check this out. still, the report is a public record, so i think it should be available. i'll keep you posted...

 
At 10:03 PM, Blogger Penn State Punk said...

Why not post the expert report?

 
At 1:30 PM, Anonymous Iago said...

This decision may be the tip of the iceberg as far as civil liberties cases go. The really big one, IMO, are the cases related to those (2?) US citizens held in detention in Gitmo thusfar for years without charge. If the SCOTUS refuses to overrule this policy of holding US citizens indefinitely, then there is no habeas corpus or civil liberty in this country. Or, for that matter, any check to the executive branch of government. This Court decision is not encouraging.

 

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