Chris Uggen's Blog: nas-ty ostinato

Saturday, January 20, 2007

nas-ty ostinato

did anyone else get a big smile when nas built hip hop is dead around in-a-gadda-da-vida's righteous ostinato? whatta riff.

i no longer have iron butterfly's original 17-minute monster version handy, but youtube delivers the short n' tight radio hit (in groovy color if you prefer). the guitar sound is heavy psychedelic, epic and iconic, but nothing like the big les paul crunch or soaring strat sound i associate with the period. so where'd they get it? as near as i can tell, the key ingredients are a creative seventeen-year-old, a mosrite guitar, a vox super beatle amp, and a fuzzrite stompbox. mosrites are most associated with surf guitarists such as the ventures, typically played with much more reverb than distortion. but the butterfly riff is pure magic. since it's as easy as smoke on the water, everyone with a guitar should certainly give it a try. here's an easy tab by m. holladay:

There is the part everyone knows:
E----------------------------------------
B----------------------------------------
G------------------------2--1--0---------
D---0---0---3p2------0------------3------
A----------------3-----------------------
E----------------------------------------

This is repeated over.. and over.. and over....... For a little variety, sometimes change the last note to a C (3rd fret, A string). Doesn't add much, but even a little helps.

The little ascending part:
E--------------------------------------------------------
B--------------------------------------------------------
G------------------1--2--1--2--3--2--1--2--1h2p1---------
D---0--2--3--2--3--------------------------------3--2----
A--------------------------------------------------------
E--------------------------------------------------------

E-----------------------------------------------------
B-----------------------------------------------------
G-----------------------------------------------------
D---5--5--5-4-3-2--2--2-3-4-5--5--5-4-3-2--2-3-4-5----
A-----------------------------------------------------
E-----------------------------------------------------

E--------------------------------------------
B--------------------------------------------
G---6--6--6-5-4-3--3-3-4-5-6--6--6-5-4-3-----
D--------------------------------------------
A--------------------------------------------
E--------------------------------------------

E----------7--6h7p6---------------------
B---7vvv-------------9--7---------------
G---8vvv-------------------9b11vvvrb9---
D---9vvv--------------------------------
A---------------------------------------
E---------------------------------------

And then just go back into the main part that repeats about a trillion times. Pretty simple song. Two more notes: For a solo, go heavy on the wah and stay in the D minor pentatonic scale (hey, it's overused but in this case, you can't go wrong playing this over that main riff). And then, periodically freak out through the rest of the song-- see what kind of noises you can get your guitar to produce.

3 Comments:

At 9:35 AM, Blogger Radio Free Newport said...

I'll always have a soft spot for "Inna," as it and CCR's "Travelin' Band" are the first two rock songs I remember liking. My much older (by 19 years) had the LP and I was totally sucked in by the drum solo. I was three or four, and had already started banging on things around the house like a drummer (so I've been told, and I've seen pictures to verify). I remember sitting with the headphones on and rocking out while reading the whacked-out liner notes and digging the groovy cover. Good stuff.

 
At 10:29 AM, Blogger Dan Myers said...

Give up sociology! Become a record producer! I love your direction on the solo--it would be perfect in the studio.

 
At 8:28 PM, Anonymous Travis @ksu said...

I agree-with the following stipulation-replace Butterfly with Tom Araya and Slayer-TL

 

Post a Comment

<< Home